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Mahonri, the Brother of Jared is an episode in VeggieTales' Book of Mormon Project. It tells the story of Mahonri Moriancumer, the brother of Jared, and their families' journey to the promised land (Ether 1-6). Its lesson is on faith. 

Cast of CharactersEdit

  • Mike Nawrocki as Larry the Cucumber as Mahonri
  • Phil Vischer as Bob the Tomato as Jared
  • Cydney Trent as Petunia Rhubarb as Edith, wife of Mahonri
  • Art and Barney as Sons of Mahonri
  • Emma as Daughter of Mahonri

StoryEdit

Jared and his brother Mahonri are righteous men who live in a city called Babel, where most of the people there are wicked. They build a tower to try to get to heaven. The Lord becomes angry and changes their language. Jared asks Mahonri to pray and ask the Lord not to change the language of their families and friends. Mahonri prays, and the Lord answers his prayer, and so Jared, Mahonri, and their families and friends can still understand one another. 

The Lord tells Mahonri to gather his family and friends and leave the land of Babel, promising that He will lead them to a promised land. They take their animals--including birds, fish, and swarms of honeybees--and all kinds of seeds with them. Called Jaredites, Mahonri, Jared, and their families travel to the wilderness, with the Lord speaking to them from a cloud and telling them which way to go. The Lord says that the people who live in the promised land must serve God or they will be destroyed. 

When the Jaredites get to the seashore, they put up their tents and stay by the sea for four years. While the Jaredites camp by the sea, Mahonri forgets to pray, and so the Lord comes in a cloud to tell him to repent. Mahonri repents and prays, and the Lord forgives him but says he should not sin anymore. The Lord tells Mahonri to build barges to take his people to the promised land, and He gives Mahonri directions on how to build these barges. Mahonri, Jared, and their families start building the barges. The barges are made airtight so no water could get inside. Pretty soon, Mahonri begins to wonder how the people will have air to breathe in the barges. He asks the Lord what he should do; the Lord tells him to make a hole in the top and bottom of each barge. That way, the hole can be opened to let air in and closed to keep water out.

Later afterwards, Mahonri tells the Lord that the barges are dark inside; the Lord asks him to think of a way to have light inside the barges, reminding Mahonri that this light cannot come from fire or from windows because they will break. Mahonri goes to a mountain and forms 16 small stones that look like clear glass from a rock, two for each of the eight barges. He then carries the stones to the top of a mountain, where he prays to the Lord, asking Him to touch the stones so they will give light inside the barges. The Lord answers Mahonri's prayer and touches each stone with his finger (off-screen). Because Mahonri has great faith, he sees the finger of the Lord, which looks like an actual finger. Then the Lord shows Himself (off-screen) to Mahonri; Jesus says that those people who believe in him will have eternal life. Jesus teaches and shows Mahonri many things, telling him to write what he had seen and heard.

Mahonri carries the stones down the mountain. He puts one stone in each end of each barge, and they give light inside the barges. The Jaredites go into the barges with their animals and food, and the Lord makes a strong wind blow the barges toward the promised land. The Lord protected the Jaredites in the rough sea, and they thank the Lord and sing praises to him.

After 344 days on the water, the barges land on the shore of the promised land. When the Jaredites come out of the barges, they kneel down and cry tears of joy. The Jaredites build homes and plant crops in the promised land. They teach their children to listen to the Lord and obey his words.

ScriptureEdit

"If you have faith, you hope for things which are not seen, which are true." (Alma 32:21)

NotesEdit

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